Blog

Fortify Allows Users to Generate X.509 Certificates in Their Browser

Posted by on June 19, 2018 in Blog | 0 comments

Fortify, an open source application sponsored by Certificate Authorities through the CA Security Council, is now available for Windows and Mac. The Fortify app, which is free for all users, connects a user’s web browsers to smart cards, security tokens, and certificates on a user’s local machine. This can allow users to generate X.509 certificates in their browser, replacing the need for the deprecated functionality. Certificate Generation In The Browser The Web Cryptography API, also known as Web Crypto, provides a set of cryptographic capabilities for web browsers through a set of...

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CA/Browser Forum Governance Reform

Posted by on May 18, 2018 in Blog | 1 comment

In March 2016, the CA/Browser Forum formed a working group to review potential ways to restructure the forum. The primary goal was to examine ideas so the Forum could work on other types of standards besides TLS. Ben Wilson and I chaired this group with excellent participation from a cross functional team of browser and certificate authority representatives as well as interested parties. After 2 years of efforts, the working group produced Ballot 206 which passed in April 2017. This created new bylaws which will go into effect on July 3, 2018. With the passing of the ballot, there exists the...

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TLS 1.3 Includes Improvements to Security and Performance

Posted by on April 10, 2018 in Blog | 0 comments

Last month saw the final adoption, after 4 years of work, of TLS version 1.3 by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF). This latest iteration of the protocol for secure communications on the internet boasts several noteworthy improvements to both security and performance: Security All cipher suites that do not provide forward secrecy have been eliminated from TLS 1.3. This is a very important security property, because without forward secrecy, if a server’s private key is compromised today, any previously-recorded conversations with that server dating back as long as the key was in...

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Chrome Will Show Not Secure for all HTTP Sites Starting July 2018

Posted by on February 15, 2018 in Blog | 0 comments

Through 2017 and into 2018, we have seen the use of HTTPS grow substantially. Last Fall Google announced the following status: Over 68% of Chrome traffic on both Android and Windows is now protected Over 78% of Chrome traffic on both Chrome OS and Mac is now protected 81 of the top 100 sites on the web use HTTPS by default Google helped to drive this growth by implementing the “Secure” and “Not secure” status in Chrome’s status bar. “Secure” was provided for HTTPS sites. “Not secure” was implemented progressively, first resulting for HTTP pages requiring a password or credit card number....

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2018 – Looking Back, Moving Forward

Posted by on January 6, 2018 in Blog | 0 comments

Looking Back at 2017 2017 saw the end of SHA-1 in public trust SSL/TLS certificates and the start of Certification Authority Authorization (CAA) allowing domain owners to authorize their CA. A “Not secure” browser indication was propagated to push more websites to support HTTPS. There was also a change in the certification authority (CA) ownership with DigiCert acquiring Symantec’s SSL and related PKI business and Francisco Partners buying Comodo’s CA. Vulnerabilities Google and CWI announced SHAttered, an attack on the SHA-1 cryptographic hash function. The attack was demonstrated by...

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How Does the ROCA Attack Work?

Posted by on November 9, 2017 in Blog | 0 comments

On October 17th, a group of Czech researchers announced they had found a way to factor the moduli of many RSA public keys generated by hardware produced by Infineon Technologies AG.  The technical details were presented in a paper at the 2017 Computer and Communications Security conference, hosted by the Association for Computing Machinery on November 2nd. The technique only works against the key pairs produced by Infineon’s library, because it exploits the unique method they use to generate RSA primes.  Key pairs produced by other methods and libraries are unaffected.  However, Infineon’s...

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