How Browser Security Indicators Can Protect You from Phishing

Posted by on June 6, 2017

The media is full of stories about how phishing sites are moving rapidly to encryption using anonymous, free DV certificates they use to imitate login pages for popular sites, such as paypal.com. As noted in the article “PayPal Phishing Certificates Far More Prevalent than Previously Thought”, https://www.thesslstore.com/blog/lets-encrypt-phishing/, more than 14,000 DV SSL certificates have been issued to PayPal phishing sites since the start of 2016.  Based on a random sample, 96.7% of these certificates were intended for use on phishing...

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Certificate Transparency Deadline Moved to April 2018

Posted by on May 3, 2017

Google just announced they will not be enforcing certificate transparency (CT) logging for all new TLS certificates until April 2018. In a previous blog post, we advised that Google provided a new policy, which required new TLS certificates to be published to the CT logs in order for the domain to be trusted by Chrome. The reason for the delay was not clear, but Google needs to consider the following: Overall CT policy discussions with the major stakeholders are underway, but we are still far away from a conclusion. Other browsers appear to...

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The Latest on Certification Authority Authorization

Posted by on March 21, 2017

Things are certainly heating up at the CA/Browser with exciting proposals surrounding inclusion of the Wi-Fi Alliance (WFA) as a subjectAltName otherName, new validation methods, and debates over how the CAB Forum will continue operating. One of these newly passed ballots requires all CAs to check and process a domain name’s DNS Certification Authority Authorization (CAA) resource record prior to issuing a digital certificate. Background RFC 6844 created CAA records as a method for domain owners to specify a policy on which certificate...

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2017 – Looking Back, Moving Forward

Posted by on January 13, 2017

Looking Back at 2016 Fortunately, 2016 was not a year full of SSL/TLS vulnerabilities. Although some researchers did prove old cryptography algorithms should be put out to pasture. The year showed the end of public-trusted SHA-1 SSL/TLS certificates. It also showed more transparency should be considered due to issues discovered with a few certification authorities (CAs). The great news is HTTPS is no longer the minority — after 20 years, connections using HTTPS has surpassed HTTP. Vulnerabilities Researchers terminated the use of the SSL...

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Stricter Standards for SSL Server Test Coming in 2017

Posted by on December 13, 2016

This is a good time to offer a reminder that the CASC has a great tool for secure server testing, the SSL Server Test. The tool grades your server installation and reviews the: certificate, protocol support, key exchange and cipher strength for security against standards and known vulnerabilities. The grading tool also provides feedback on handshake simulations with various versions of browsers and operating systems. This lets the server administrator know which implementations are supported. The test also checks the server mitigation for...

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The Web Is Moving From HTTP to HTTPS

Posted by on November 21, 2016

The four letters, “http”, are known to technical and non-technical users alike as the beginning of any web address. These have been ubiquitous for many years. But things are about to change. Pretty soon, you won’t be able to go to many popular websites just by using those 4 letters. You will need to add an “s” at the end (https). Why is this happening? What are the reasons for this change? https indicates that a web page uses the security protocol known as TLS (previously known and more commonly referred to as SSL). This shows that...

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Trust on the Public Web – The Consequences of Covert Action

Posted by on November 11, 2016

You may have heard in the news that the Chinese Certificate Authority, WoSign, was caught backdating SHA-1 certificates to make it look like they were issued before the December 31, 2015 deadline. Why is this newsworthy?  For web-based security to remain an integral part of an ecosystem used every day by millions of people around the world, it all comes down to Trust; trust in the organization issuing the certificates, trust in the browsers that validate and display certificate information to the user, and trust by relying parties browsing...

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Google Certificate Transparency (CT) to Expand to All Certificates Types

Posted by on November 8, 2016

The policy change goes into effect October 2017 A recent Google announcement stated that all publicly trusted SSL/TLS certificates issued in October 2017 or later will be expected to comply with Chrome’s Certificate Transparency (CT) policy or be untrusted by the browser. Since January 2015, Chrome has required Extended Validation (EV) certificates to comply with CT. With this policy change, the Chrome CT policy will also apply to Domain Validated (DV) and Organization Validated (OV) certificates. For more than two years, CAs have supported...

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Why Is Certificate Expiration Necessary?

Posted by on October 19, 2016

The Long Life Certificate – Why It Doesn’t Exist Why is certificate expiration even necessary? Wouldn’t it be better if I could just buy a certificate with a long life before expiration? It would really simplify certificate management if it could be installed and forgotten. Simple, no management required, just file-and-forget. Imagine, I’ve been in business, starting say 10 to 15 years ago. I roll out my web pages and secure them with a 20-year-validity SSL certificate. I do this by creating a 512-bit RSA key securely stored in the...

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Always-On SSL

Posted by on September 30, 2016

There is no doubt that content owners and publishers have a duty to encourage trust and the confidence during internet usage by adopting security best practices. If a customer believes that their data and identity are safe and protected, they are more inclined to continue their online transactions. Industry best practices for website protection should be vendor-neutral, easy to implement, and globally accessible. Websites should take all the reasonable steps possible to adopt best practices in secure design and implementation, and this...

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